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Communication Sensing and Imaging Lab

University of Glasgow

University of Glasgow

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Healthcare Technologies

WIRELESS HEALTHCARE

The healthcare paradigm is shifting from doctor-centric to patient-centric concept. The prevailing techniques to enable this paradigm shift uses ambient sensors, cameras and wearable devices that primarily require strenuous deployment overheads and raise privacy concerns as well. To overcome aforementioned issues, an emerging technique to use perturbations in Channel State Information (CSI) of wireless signals for detecting human movements (which are linked to various health conditions) is attracting attention due to its non-invasive nature and security feature. Our work is focused on the development of non-invasive, easily deployable, flexible, and scalable testbed for identifying large-scale and small-scale body movements based on Software Defined Radios (SDRs). By employing, machine learning on the collected data, we can do proactive health measures.

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Activity Recognition and vital signs monitoring: healthcare and veterinary applications

Research applications include the analysis of human and animal radar signatures across different domains of data representations for classification and vital sign monitoring. This can be applied to classify different activities (walking, running, human interactions), as well as healthcare (e.g. fall detection, activities of daily living, and out-patient follow up care) and lameness assessment for precision livestock farming (cattle, sheep) and leisure/racehorses. These works encompass signal processing, machine learning, and multimodal sensing including radar, accelerometers, IMUs.

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EMERGENCY NETWORKING (POP-UP NETWORKS)

Disasters are a huge threat to communication systems either due to network infrastructure being destroyed or the network being overwhelmed by a sharp rise in traffic, thereby degrading network performance. Current systems are expensive to operate and maintain in times of emergency, and require significant human intervention, resulting in long commissioning and decommissioning times. This work aims to design a pop-up emergency network, based on the principles of self-organisation (configuration, optimisation, and healing), that considers the peculiarities of emergency communications – power, backhaul and deployment time. The use of entities such as small cells and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles will also be explored to address the challenges of emergency communications.

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